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Why did you pick the tailwheel version?

Because of my background with sailplanes as well as the fact that my dad has owned taildraggers for as long as I can remember it just seemed like the only airplanes I knew growing up had the extra wheel on the back. I like the extra challenge of flying a conventional gear plane and I intend to fly in and out of soft fields. I know that the nosewheel airplanes can get in and out of these strips as well but I don't want to have to cut my way out of an upside-down airplane because of a gopher hole. I also just like the way they look sitting on the ramp. Did I mention they were lighter.

The drawbacks are the taxi visibility is not as good, although it is more than sufficient and insurance will cost a little more.

People have said that they want to have their wife take lessons in the airplane so it must be a nosewheel. I am no expert but I have seen many people do their primary flight instruction in a tailwheel. How many people out there learned to fly in a Cub? That being said the RV-7A is probably easier to handle on the ground but remember that nosewheel is a castoring nosewheel and is not steerable so it won't drive like that 172 that you are used to anyway.

This is a very controversial issue amongst RVers and not all of the decisions that we make are made strictly on the basis of what is most practical, sometimes we just make a decision because it is what we want. In the end each one of these airplanes should be exactly what the builder wants it to be. After all that is why we are building in the first place right?


Disclaimer:
This web site and the infomation contained within it are for entertainment purposes only. The opinions expressed on construction techniques are my opinions only and should not be confused with proper construction techniques. There is undoubtedly more than one way to build an airplane and some methods that I use may or may not work in any given circumstance. If there is any question please call the kit manufacturer. I love to help but I am not responsible for the misuse of any information contained on this web site.



 March 3, 2016
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